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Biodiversity in the Age of Humans
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Three leading scientists describe the state of biodiversity on our planet and how to face the great challenges that lie ahead.

Anthony D. Barnosky, PhD
University of California, Berkeley
Is Earth on the cusp of a sixth mass extinction? As a paleobiologist, Dr. Barnosky studies the fossil record to better understand what constitutes and causes mass extinctions. This knowledge can help us assess current threats to biodiversity and lead to solutions that can be brought to bear before it is too late.

Elizabeth A. Hadly, PhD
Stanford University
From Southeast Asia to the Rocky Mountains, to the jungles of Central America, the growing human footprint is destroying wild habitats and reducing animal biodiversity within them. Dr. Hadly studies and documents these effects, identifying threats and presenting strategies for saving the wild species that remain.

Stephen R. Palumbi, PhD
Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University
Ocean ecosystems present different challenges and opportunities than ecosystems on land. As a marine biologist, Dr. Palumbi studies life in the ocean, focusing on the great diversity in extreme environments and the genetic mechanisms by which marine organisms deal with environmental threats and stresses.

Presented at HHMI's 2014 Holiday Lectures on Science. Two discs, approximate lecture time 240 minutes.

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