National Awards to Foster Science Education

Fifty research universities in 30 states and the District of Columbia, including five first-time awardees, will collect a total of $70 million through the undergraduate program.

In May, HHMI announced $79 million of new grants to help universities strengthen undergraduate and precollege science education nationwide. The resources will allow faculty at research universities to develop creative new ways to teach and inspire students about science and research.

HHMI is making the awards through its Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program and the HHMI Professors Program—two complementary initiatives aimed at transforming science education in the United States.

“HHMI is committed to funding education programs that excite students’ interest in science,” says HHMI President Robert Tjian. “We hope that these programs will shape the way students look at the world—whether those students ultimately choose to pursue a career in science or not.”

Fifty research universities in 30 states and the District of Columbia, including five first-time awardees, will collect a total of $70 million through the undergraduate program. The schools will use the grants, which range from $800,000 to $2 million over four years, to develop creative, research-based courses and curricula; to give more students vital experience working in the lab; and to improve science teaching from elementary school through college.

Some grantees will work to improve their introductory courses and to offer research opportunities to community college students. Others plan to focus on increasing diversity in the sciences through outreach and mentoring of middle and high school students. And some institutions will use portions of their funds to provide better scientific training and research experiences for future K–12 science teachers.

In addition to the grants to research universities, $9 million over four years will go to 13 HHMI professors, a small group of leading research scientists who are committed to making science more engaging for undergraduates and K–12 students. The HHMI professors will focus on solving important problems facing science education, such as how best to bring research into the classroom, teach large introductory science courses, and encourage students from diverse backgrounds to become scientists.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Visit HHMI News to see lists of the universities and professors receiving the HHMI awards.