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Showing 1-100 of 116 Resources
  • Mate Choice in Spiders

    Mate Choice in Spiders

    Data Points

    Scientists investigated how males choose their mates in a species of sexually cannibalistic spiders.

  • Analyzing Data on Tuskless Elephants

    Analyzing Data on Tuskless Elephants

    Lessons

    In this activity, students analyze data to investigate tusklessness in elephant populations.

  • Cougars and Trees in a Trophic Cascade

    Cougars and Trees in a Trophic Cascade

    Data Points

    In Zion National Park, scientists studied the effects of tourism on cougars and cottonwood trees.

  • Serengeti Wildebeest Population Regulation

    Serengeti Wildebeest Population Regulation

    Data Points

    This activity analyzes a published scientific figure from a study in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. In this study, scientists investigated how the eradication of rinderpest disease led to a boom in the wildebeest population.

  • Salt Stress Impacts Photosynthesis in Algae

    Salt Stress Impacts Photosynthesis in Algae

    Data Points

    Scientists investigated how salt affects the photosynthetic electron transport chain in freshwater green alga.

  • Age Structure of Ebola Outbreaks

    Age Structure of Ebola Outbreaks

    Data Points

    Scientists analyzed demographics, including sex and age, of the spread of the Ebola Virus Disease during seven outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

  • Mapping the Darién Gap

    Mapping the Darién Gap

    Scientists at Work

    (10 min 35 sec) This video describes how indigenous communities from the tropical rainforest of Darién, Panama, use drones to map their lands. The communities use these maps to protect their territories from outside incursions and to design sustainable land-use plans.

  • Developing an Explanation for Mouse Fur Color

    Developing an Explanation for Mouse Fur Color

    Lessons

    In this activity, students collect and analyze evidence for each of the major conditions for evolution by natural selection to develop an explanation for how populations change over time.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Mechanism and Treatment

    Cystic Fibrosis Mechanism and Treatment

    Animations

    (2 min 31 sec) Mutations in the CFTR gene, which encodes a transmembrane ion channel, cause mucus buildup in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis.

  • CRISPR-Cas 9 Mechanism & Applications

    CRISPR-Cas 9 Mechanism & Applications

    Click & Learn

    Explore this dynamic interactive to learn the basic principles of how this revolutionary tool works and the many ways in which scientists are using it in their research.

  • Pelvic Evolution in Sticklebacks

    Pelvic Evolution in Sticklebacks

    Data Points

    Scientists used SNP genotyping in populations of freshwater stickleback fish to determine the genetic mutations responsible for the impaired development of pelvises and spines.

  • Central Dogma Card Activity

    Central Dogma Card Activity

    Card Activities

    In this hands-on activity students review the steps of eukaryotic gene expression and learn how this knowledge can be used to treat genetic disease.

  • New Laetoli Footprints and Hominin Body Size

    New Laetoli Footprints and Hominin Body Size

    Data Points

    Scientists were excavating a site in Laetoli, Tanzania when they uncovered two new sets of hominin tracks located about 150 meters south of the tracks found by Mary Leakey in the 1970’s. They estimated the heights of the two individuals using the size and shape of the footprints.

  • Think Like a Scientist: Gorongosa

    Think Like a Scientist: Gorongosa

    Scientists at Work

    (6 min 40 sec) This video describes a large-scale project to restore the wildlife of Gorongosa National Park. The video highlights the project’s approach of combining traditional conservation biology with solutions for addressing challenges in the community.

  • Film Guide for Genes as Medicine

    Film Guide for Genes as Medicine

    Film Activities

    The following classroom-ready resources complement the film Genes as Medicine. It tells the story of the successes and challenges that led to the development of the first FDA-approved gene therapy for a genetic disease.

  • Niche Partitioning and DNA Metabarcoding

    Niche Partitioning and DNA Metabarcoding

    Click & Learn

    This interactive explores niche partitioning as a mechanism that enables similar species of animals to coexist.

  • Maternal Microbiota Impacts Offspring Immune System

    Maternal Microbiota Impacts Offspring Immune System

    Data Points

    This activity analyzes a published scientific figure from a study assessing if the microbiota from a mother affects the immune systems of the developing offspring.

  • Seed Dispersal in Tropical Forests

    Seed Dispersal in Tropical Forests

    Lessons

    In this activity, students use data from published studies to understand patterns of seed dispersal and apply these ideas to the design of a conservation area.

  • The Search for a Mutated Gene

    The Search for a Mutated Gene

    Scientists at Work

    (8 min 54 sec) This video describes the case of a patient with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a progressive disease that leads to blindness, and how physician-scientist Dr. Ed Stone approached the search for the causal mutation.

  • Genes as Medicine

    Genes as Medicine

    Short Films

    (17 min 16 sec) This film describes the scientific principles and the research efforts involved in the development of a gene therapy for a congenital form of blindness, and how a young patient benefited from this medical breakthrough.

  • Origins of Antibiotic Resistance

    Origins of Antibiotic Resistance

    Data Points

    Scientists collected bacteria from locations that had never been exposed to humans or modern antibiotics to determine if antibiotic resistance is newly evolved since the introduction of antibiotics or has evolved independently.

  • Identifying the Key Genes for Regeneration

    Identifying the Key Genes for Regeneration

    Scientists at Work

    (9 min 55 sec) This video describes how scientists silence different genes in regenerating planaria to study the process of regeneration at the molecular level.

  • Vertebrate Declines and the Sixth Mass Extinction

    Vertebrate Declines and the Sixth Mass Extinction

    Data Points

    In this study, researchers measured species population declines on a global scale that may contribute to the sixth mass extinction.

  • Central Dogma and Genetic Medicine

    Central Dogma and Genetic Medicine

    Click & Learn

    This interactive uses the central dogma as a model for exploring how modern molecular biology technologies can be used to treat genetic diseases.

  • What van Leeuwenhoek Saw

    What van Leeuwenhoek Saw

    Card Activities

    This hands-on activity helps students understand concepts related to building scale models by using cards of microorganisms and cells that were first visualized by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek.

  • Predator-Prey Relationship Dynamics

    Predator-Prey Relationship Dynamics

    Data Points

    In a study in Greenland, scientists examined whether changes in population densities of Arctic fox are related to changes in population densities of its main prey, the lemming.

  • Tracking Genetically Modified Mosquitoes

    Tracking Genetically Modified Mosquitoes

    Lessons

    Genetically modified mosquitoes have been used to reduce mosquito populations and the diseases they spread. But how can we tell if the method works? In this activity, students analyze data from a field experiment.

  • Microbial Community Response to an Oil Spill

    Microbial Community Response to an Oil Spill

    Data Points

    Researchers monitored the succession of the microbial community in the Gulf of Mexico using data from before, during, and after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

  • Population Dynamics

    Population Dynamics

    Click & Learn

    Explore the exponential and the logistic growth mathematical models that describe how population changes with time.

  • Using Wolbachia to Suppress Mosquito Fertility

    Using Wolbachia to Suppress Mosquito Fertility

    Data Points

    In this study, researchers tested whether releasing Wolbachia-infected male Aedes albopictus (Asian tiger mosquitoes) would suppress populations of this mosquito species in their study area.

  • How Lizards Find Their Way Home

    How Lizards Find Their Way Home

    Scientists at Work

    (8 min 33 sec) This video describes the research of Dr. Manuel Leal, who is studying territorial lizards to understand how they navigate the dense forests of Puerto Rico to find their way to their home trees.

  • Sleep Clears β-amyloid from the Brain

    Sleep Clears β-amyloid from the Brain

    Data Points

    This activity analyzes a published scientific figure from a study that investigated the biological importance of sleep. In this study, scientists tested whether sleep plays a role in removing harmful substances from the brain.

  • Trophic Cascades in Salt Marsh Ecosystems

    Trophic Cascades in Salt Marsh Ecosystems

    Scientists at Work

    (10 min 1 sec) Ecologist Brian Silliman uses manipulative field experiments to reveal that salt marsh ecosystems are under top down control from consumers and predators.

  • Riverine Food Webs – How Flow Rates Affect Biomass

    Riverine Food Webs – How Flow Rates Affect Biomass

    Scientists at Work

    (9 min 15 sec) Ecologist Mary Power studies the Eel River in Northern California to figure out the connection between river flows and biodiversity.

  • Mimicry in a Diverse Community of Arthropods

    Mimicry in a Diverse Community of Arthropods

    Data Points

    Researchers exposed arthropod mimics that use a golden patch to warn of unpalatability to predators with different prey preferences to determine how effective their warnings were.

  • Snail Fronts and Salt Marsh Die-Offs

    Snail Fronts and Salt Marsh Die-Offs

    Data Points

    Researchers studied whether periwinkle snail fronts expand mudflats and contribute to salt marsh die-offs.

  • Tracking Global Changes in Forest Cover

    Tracking Global Changes in Forest Cover

    Data Points

    Researchers used satellite imagery analyze the amount of forest that was lost annually across the globe between 2000 and 2012.

  • Studying Elephant Communication

    Studying Elephant Communication

    Scientists at Work

    (6 min 43 sec) Elephants can communicate over long distances using low-frequency sounds that travel both in the air and through the ground. Scientists are studying whether elephants can “hear” and interpret these ground vibrations.

  • Cell Division and Cancer Risk

    Cell Division and Cancer Risk

    Data Points

    Cancer is typically attributed to hereditary and environmental factors, but these only explain a fraction of overall cancer risk. In this study, researchers investigated how a third factor—chance genetic mutations that occur during stem cell division—may contribute to the overall rate of cancer incidence in different body tissues.

  • Bat Echolocation

    Bat Echolocation

    Data Points

    In this study, researchers tested whether bats change their behavior while hunting based on feedback from echolocation.

  • DNA Profiling Activity

    DNA Profiling Activity

    Case Studies

    This multi-part lesson is designed to give students a firm understanding of genetic profiling using short tandem repeats (STRs), which is a process used by forensics labs around the world. 

  • Dating Corn Domestication Using Carbon Isotopes

    Dating Corn Domestication Using Carbon Isotopes

    Data Points

    To study the change in diet as human populations changed lifestyles from hunter-gatherers to agriculturalists, scientists measured carbon isotopes in the collagen tissues of human skeletons from North America.

  • Genetically Modified Mosquitoes

    Genetically Modified Mosquitoes

    Scientists at Work

    (8 min 35 sec) Learn the process by which a line of genetically modified mosquitoes was engineered to reduce populations of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in the wild.

  • How Animals Use Sound to Communicate

    How Animals Use Sound to Communicate

    Click & Learn

    Using elephants, finches, bats, and moths, as case studies, explore different aspects of how animals use sound to communicate.

  • Patterns of Zoonotic Disease

    Patterns of Zoonotic Disease

    Data Points

    In this study, scientists analyzed previously published data on terrestrial mammal zoonotic host species and the pathogens they carry to search for global patterns of zoonotic disease distribution.

  • The Effects of Fungicides on Bumble Bee Colonies

    The Effects of Fungicides on Bumble Bee Colonies

    Scientists at Work

    (6 min 25 sec) Are fungicides safe for bumble bees? Entomologist Shawn Steffan designed an experiment to answer this question.

  • Tagging Bumble Bees to Study Their Movements

    Tagging Bumble Bees to Study Their Movements

    Scientists at Work

    (6 min 1 sec) Graduate student Jeremy Hemberger designs an experiment to study the foraging behavior of bumble bees in different habitats.

  • Thermoregulation in Dinosaurs

    Thermoregulation in Dinosaurs

    Data Points

    Grady and colleagues compared dinosaur fossil evidence with evidence from living animal species to shed more light on the type of thermoregulation that dinosaurs used—ectothermy, endothermy, or mesothermy.

  • Film Guide for Some Animals are More Equal than Others

    Film Guide for Some Animals are More Equal than Others

    Film Activities

    The following classroom-ready resources complement the film Some Animals Are More Equal Than Others: Trophic Cascades and Keystone Species. It tells the story of the bold experiments by Robert Paine and James Estes, which established the importance of keystone species in regulating ecological communities and the cascades of effects set in motion by their removal.

  • Virus Hunter: Monitoring Nipah Virus in Bat Populations

    Virus Hunter: Monitoring Nipah Virus in Bat Populations

    Scientists at Work

    (9 min 1 sec) In this video we follow scientists working in Bangladesh as they test fruit bat populations to determine whether they are infected with Nipah virus—a potentially deadly virus when passed on to humans.

  • Selective Breeding in Maize

    Selective Breeding in Maize

    Data Points

    Researchers performed the longest-running, controlled artificial selection experiment to study whether they could increase the protein concentration of maize (corn) by selective breeding.

  • Using Genetic Evidence to Identify Ivory Poaching Hotspots

    Using Genetic Evidence to Identify Ivory Poaching Hotspots

    Data Points

    A team of scientists analyzed the DNA from seized ivory to determine where the ivory from poached elephants came from.

  • Survey Methods

    Survey Methods

    Click & Learn

    In this interactive, students explore the methods scientists use to survey elephants and learn about the current state of the elephant population in Africa.

  • The Great Elephant Census

    The Great Elephant Census

    Scientists at Work

    (8 min 23 sec) How many African elephants are left and where are they? This video follows the work of researchers conducting the first census of African savanna elephants in over 40 years and the methods they are using to obtain accurate, up-to-date numbers across the continent. 

  • Origin of a Gene Mutation Causing Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    Origin of a Gene Mutation Causing Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

    Data Points

    This activity analyzes a published scientific figure from a study of a family that has a high prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease.

  • Moth Mimicry: Using Ultrasound to Avoid Bats

    Moth Mimicry: Using Ultrasound to Avoid Bats

    Scientists at Work

    (10 min 24 sec) This video follows scientists as they uncover the ways in which moth species in Gorongosa National Park use ultrasound to avoid being eaten by bats.

  • Amylase Copy Number and Diet

    Amylase Copy Number and Diet

    Data Points

    A team of scientists investigated whether there is a correlation between the number of AMY1 gene copies and the type of diet (high-starch or low-starch) of a population.

  • Some Animals Are More Equal than Others: Keystone Species and Trophic Cascades

    Some Animals Are More Equal than Others: Keystone Species and Trophic Cascades

    Short Films

    (19 min 29 sec) Keystone species and trophic cascades are fundamental concepts in ecology. This short film tells the story of how these concepts were first established through the pioneering experiments of two young researchers: Robert Paine and James Estes.

  • Identifying Autism Genes by Tracking Gene Mutations

    Identifying Autism Genes by Tracking Gene Mutations

    Data Points

    A team of scientists used homozygosity mapping to map SNPs on chromosome 3 in a family with an autistic son to identify a likely gene that caused the disorder.

  • The Teosinte Hypothesis

    The Teosinte Hypothesis

    Lessons

    In this activity, students further explore the short film Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn, by working through the mathematical concepts behind George Beadle’s claim that teosinte is the wild ancestor of maize.

  • Effects of Predation on the Niche of Lizards

    Effects of Predation on the Niche of Lizards

    Data Points

    A team of scientists studied the effects of introducing a lizard predator on the food webs of a group of small islands in the Bahamas.

  • A Science-Based Approach to Restoring Gorongosa's Wildlife

    A Science-Based Approach to Restoring Gorongosa's Wildlife

    Scientists at Work

    (7 min 45 sec) Scientists from Gorongosa National Park relocate zebras from a nearby reserve as part of the effort to restore healthy wildlife populations.

  • Origin of Birds With Quiz

    Origin of Birds With Quiz

    Interactive Videos

    (18 min 59 sec) Embedded quiz modules test students’ understanding as they watch a short film about the evidence that showed birds descended from dinosaurs.

  • Trends in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    Trends in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    Data Points

    This activity analyzes a figure showing the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration from 1958 to 2016.

  • Resistance to Coral Bleaching

    Resistance to Coral Bleaching

    Data Points

    This activity analyzes a published scientific figure from a study that tested whether corals can become more resistant to bleaching.

  • Sampling and Normal Distribution

    Sampling and Normal Distribution

    Click & Learn

    Graphically explore how sample distribution and standard error of the mean depends on the sample size.

  • Genetic Origin of Variation in Human Skin Color

    Genetic Origin of Variation in Human Skin Color

    Data Points

    Dr. Rebecca Lamason and colleagues studied the genetic origin of variation in human skin color using a model organism, the zebrafish.

  • Niche Partitioning and Species Coexistence

    Niche Partitioning and Species Coexistence

    Scientists at Work

    (8 min 14 sec) This video describes the cutting-edge method of DNA metabarcoding and how it is used to study how animals partition resources in a shared habitat.

  • Analyzing Patterns in the Savanna Landscape

    Analyzing Patterns in the Savanna Landscape

    Scientists at Work

    (7 min 57 sec) This video showcases the work of mathematician-turned-biologist Dr. Corina Tarnita, who uses quantitative approaches to understand the role of termite mounds in the savanna ecosystem.

  • Comparative Anatomy of the Domestic Chicken

    Comparative Anatomy of the Domestic Chicken

    Click & Learn

    This interactive module traces the evolutionary history of birds by comparing the bone structures of a chicken to those of other species.

  • Human Skin Color: Evidence for Selection

    Human Skin Color: Evidence for Selection

    Case Studies

    In this case study, students use real data to propose hypotheses, make predictions, and justify claims with evidence, as an exploration of concepts presented in the short film The Biology of Skin Color.

  • The Origin of Flight: What Use Is Half a Wing?

    The Origin of Flight: What Use Is Half a Wing?

    Scientists at Work

    (8 min 16 sec) Biologist Ken Dial's study of how young birds use their developing wings sheds light on the evolution of flight in birds.

  • Activity for Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn

    Activity for Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn

    Film Activities

    This activity explores how scientists determined how and where corn was domesticated, as discussed in the short film Popped Secret: The Mysterious Origin of Corn.

  • Modeling Ecosystem Effects of Termite Mound Patterns

    Modeling Ecosystem Effects of Termite Mound Patterns

    Data Points

    Dr. Corina Tarnita and colleagues studied how a pattern of termite mounds across a dryland ecosystem enhances resilience against desertification.

  • Human Feet Are Strange

    Human Feet Are Strange

    Labs & Demos

    In this activity, students examine concepts about the evolution of human bipedality explored in the short film Great Transitions: The Origin of Humans. They create their own trackway of footprints and compare it to a trackway of fossil footprints.

  • Effects of Natural Selection on Finch Beak Size

    Effects of Natural Selection on Finch Beak Size

    Data Points

    Rosemary and Peter Grant studied the change in beak depths of finches on the island of Daphne Major in the Galápagos Islands after a drought.

  • Schooling Behavior of Stickleback Fish from Different Habitats

    Schooling Behavior of Stickleback Fish from Different Habitats

    Data Points

    A team of scientists studied the schooling behavior of threespine stickleback fish by experimentally testing how individual fish responded to an artificial fish school model.

  • Surveying Gorongosa's Biodiversity

    Surveying Gorongosa's Biodiversity

    Scientists at Work

    (8 min 24 sec) Biologists Piotr Naskrecki and Jennifer Guyton identify and record the diversity of species in Gorongosa National Park’s Cheringoma Plateau.

  • How Did Dinosaurs Regulate Their Body Temperature?

    How Did Dinosaurs Regulate Their Body Temperature?

    Lessons

    This activity uses data from a 2014 scientific paper to explore thermoregulation in living and extinct animals, including dinosaurs. 

  • Tracking Lion Recovery in Gorongosa National Park

    Tracking Lion Recovery in Gorongosa National Park

    Scientists at Work

    (8 min 58 sec) See how scientists in Gorongosa National Park are using GPS satellite collars and motion-sensitive cameras to gather data about the recovery of the park’s lion population.

  • Living Dinosaurs: Fact or Fiction?

    Living Dinosaurs: Fact or Fiction?

    Lessons

    In this activity, students evaluate and discuss statements about the evolutionary relationship between birds and dinosaurs covered in the short film Great Transitions: The Origin of Birds.

  • The Origin of Birds Film Guide

    The Origin of Birds Film Guide

    Film Activities

    The following classroom-ready resources complement Great Transitions: The Origin of Birds. Featuring vertebrate paleontologist Dr. Julia Clarke, the film walks us through the evidence that birds are a lineage of theropod dinosaurs. 

  • Episode 1: Your Inner Fish

    Episode 1: Your Inner Fish

    Feature Films

    (54 min 41 sec) See how the genetic legacy of a fish can be seen today in our own DNA. PLEASE N​OTE: Due to international distribution restrictions, these programs can only be streamed in the United States and Canada.

  • Look Who's Coming for Dinner: Selection by Predation

    Look Who's Coming for Dinner: Selection by Predation

    Card Activities

    In this activity, students formulate a hypothesis and collect and analyze real research data about how quickly natural selection can act on specific traits in a population as a result of predation. It is a accompanied by a short video that describes the experiment this activity is based on.

  • Coral Reefs and Global Warming

    Coral Reefs and Global Warming

    Lessons

    This activity allows students to use authentic scientific data to make claims about the threat of coral bleaching for reefs around the world.

  • Steve Palumbi & Megan Morikawa Study Coral Reef Damage in American Samoa

    Steve Palumbi & Megan Morikawa Study Coral Reef Damage in American Samoa

    Scientists at Work

    (7 min 1 sec) This video describes the work of biologists Steve Palumbi and Megan Morikawa, who use field and controlled experiments to understand the mechanisms that allow some corals to tolerate a greater amount of heat stress than other corals.

  • Anthony Barnosky and Kaitlin Maguire Measure Mammal Extinctions at the John Day Fossil Beds

    Anthony Barnosky and Kaitlin Maguire Measure Mammal Extinctions at the John Day Fossil Beds

    Scientists at Work

    (9 min 15 sec) Prehistoric extinction rates are calculated from fossil data in a paleodatabase and compared to today’s extinction rate.

  • Reading Primary Sources: Darwin and Wallace

    Reading Primary Sources: Darwin and Wallace

    Lessons

    This activity serves as a supplement to the HHMI short film The Origin of Species: The Making of a Theory. Students read and analyze excerpts from texts written by Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace and answer questions about the information presented, developing their nonfiction reading comprehension.

  • Milk: How Sweet Is It?

    Milk: How Sweet Is It?

    Labs & Demos

    In this activity, students simulate a lactose tolerance test, similar to the one shown in the short film The Making of the Fittest: Got Lactase? The Co-evolution of Genes and Culture, to determine which samples contain the lactase enzyme.

  • Mapping Genes to Traits in Dogs Using SNPs

    Mapping Genes to Traits in Dogs Using SNPs

    Card Activities

    In this activity, students identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are correlated with different traits in dogs to identify genes associated with those traits.

  • Gorongosa Timeline

    Gorongosa Timeline

    Click & Learn

    A highly visual interactive timeline for exploring the history of Gorongosa National Park, from its beginnings as a hunting reserve and decline in the wake of a civil war, to its return to being one of the world’s foremost wildlife treasures and case studies in conservation biology.  

  • Film Guides: The Guide: A Biologist in Gorongosa

    Film Guides: The Guide: A Biologist in Gorongosa

    Film Activities

    The following classroom-ready resources complement The Guide: A Biologist in Gorongosa, which tells the story of Tonga Torcida, a young man coming of age on Mount Gorongosa and in the newly revitalized Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique.

  • The Guide: A Biologist in Gorongosa

    The Guide: A Biologist in Gorongosa

    Short Films

    (34 min 22 sec) This film is set in war-torn Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, a protected area that has been the subject of a large-scale restoration project. The film tells the story of a young man from the local community who discovers a passion for science after meeting world-renowned biologist E.O. Wilson.

  • Identifying Patterns in Observations

    Identifying Patterns in Observations

    Lessons

    This activity challenges students to identify observations that Darwin and Wallace made during their travels, as shown in the short film The Origin of Species: The Making of a Theory. Students then evaluate claims about evolution by natural selection based on these observations.

  • Discovering the Wallace Line

    Discovering the Wallace Line

    Lessons

    This activity supports the HHMI short film The Origin of Species: The Making of a Theory. Students are presented with a map of the Malay Archipelago and some field notebooks with observations of animals. By plotting which animals are found on which island, the students discover the Wallace Line—a sharp boundary that separates distinct Asian and Australian fauna. 

  • Pulse Chase Primer: The Meselson-Stahl Experiment

    Pulse Chase Primer: The Meselson-Stahl Experiment

    Lessons

    This activity can be used in conjunction with the short film The Double Helix. It introduces students to the classic experiment by Matthew Meselson and Franklin Stahl, which revealed that DNA replication follows the semiconservative model.

  • The Making of a Theory—Fact or Fiction

    The Making of a Theory—Fact or Fiction

    Lessons

    This activity supports the viewing of the film The Origin of Species: The Making of a Theory. Before and after watching the film, students discuss and evaluate several statements about Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, and the specific evidence that led each of them to the theory of evolution by natural selection.

  • Beaks As Tools: Selective Advantage in Changing Environments

    Beaks As Tools: Selective Advantage in Changing Environments

    Labs & Demos

    This classroom experiment supports the film The Origin of Species: The Beak of the Finch. Students collect and analyze data to learn why even slight variations in beak size can make the difference between life and death.

  • Evolution in Action: Data Analysis

    Evolution in Action: Data Analysis

    Lessons

    These two activities support the film The Origin of Species: The Beak of the Finch. They provide students with the opportunity to analyze data collected by Princeton University evolutionary biologists Peter and Rosemary Grant.

  • Film Guides: The Origin of Species: The Making of a Theory

    Film Guides: The Origin of Species: The Making of a Theory

    Film Activities

    The following classroom-ready resources complement The Origin of Species: The Making of a Theory, which tells the story of the epic adventures of Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace and of the evidence they gathered for the theory of evolution by means of natural selection

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