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Showing 1-20 of 33 Resources
  • How We Get Our Skin Color

    How We Get Our Skin Color

    Animations

    (3 min 32 sec) This engaging animation shows how human skin cells produce the pigment melanin, which gives skin its color. 

  • Coral Bleaching

    Coral Bleaching

    Animations

    (3 min 48 sec) Zoom into a coral reef and discover photosynthetic algae inside the coral’s cells. Reef-building corals rely on these symbionts for their survival.

  • Cancer and Cell Fate in the Intestinal Epithelium

    Cancer and Cell Fate in the Intestinal Epithelium

    Animations

    (2 min 17 sec) Disrupting the normal processes of differentiation and maturation of the intestinal epithelial cells can lead to cancer. Also available in Spanish.

  • Autism and the Structure and Function of Synapses

    Autism and the Structure and Function of Synapses

    Animations

    (2 min 3 sec) Genes associated with autism affect the structure and function of neuronal synapses.

  • Development of the Cerebral Cortex

    Development of the Cerebral Cortex

    Animations

    (1 min 43 sec) Most of the neurons of the cerebral cortex arise from progenitor cells that undergo repeated cell division.

  • Gleevec-Resistant Form of Kinase BCR-ABL

    Gleevec-Resistant Form of Kinase BCR-ABL

    Animations

    (2 min 14 sec) Mutations in the BCR-ABL gene can cause resistance to Gleevec, but another drug, dasatinib, can be used instead.

  • Gleevec Inhibits Cancer-Causing Kinase BCR-ABL

    Gleevec Inhibits Cancer-Causing Kinase BCR-ABL

    Animations

    (3 min 31 sec) The drug Gleevec binds to and inactivates BCR-ABL, a mutant kinase that causes chronic myeloid leukemia. 

  • Cloning an Army of T Cells for Immune Defense

    Cloning an Army of T Cells for Immune Defense

    Animations

    (4 min 21 sec) View the animation to see how one type of immune cell—the helper T cell—interprets a message presented at the surface of the cell membrane. The message is an antigen, a protein fragment taken from an invading microbe. A series of events unfolds that results in the production of many clones of the helper T cell. These identical T cells can serve as a brigade forming an essential communication network to activate B cells, which make antibodies that will specifically attack the activating antigen.

  • Dengue Virus Enters a Cell

    Dengue Virus Enters a Cell

    Animations

    (1 min 33 sec) Infection begins when the dengue virus uses receptors on an immune cell's surface to gain entry and release its genome.

  • The LUX operon controls light production

    The LUX operon controls light production

    Animations

    (2 min 25 sec) A single transcription factor controls this operon, which contains five genes necessary to produce bioluminescence.

  • Prialt blocks motor synapse in fish

    Prialt blocks motor synapse in fish

    Animations

    (2 min 31 sec) Prialt, a drug derived from cone snail venom, paralyzes fish by blocking calcium channels at a motor synapse.

  • Molecular Mechanism of Synaptic Function

    Molecular Mechanism of Synaptic Function

    Animations

    (1 min 9 sec) Electrical and chemical signals are used by neurons to communicate with one another at contact points called synapses. Also available in Spanish.

  • Signal molecules trigger transcription factors

    Signal molecules trigger transcription factors

    Animations

    (2 min 4 sec) Varying concentrations of a signaling molecule activate different transcription factors and determine cell fate.

  • HIV life cycle

    HIV life cycle

    Animations

    (4 min 52 sec) How HIV infects a cell and replicates itself using reverse transcriptase and the host's cellular machinery.

  • Antigen presentation and CTL

    Antigen presentation and CTL

    Animations

    (2 min 34 sec) How a cell infected by a virus signals cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill the cell before the virus replicates and spreads.

  • Human Embryonic Development

    Human Embryonic Development

    Animations

    (2 min 18 sec) Human embryonic development depends on stem cells. During the course of development, cells divide, migrate, and specialize. Early in development, a group of cells called the inner cell mass (ICM) forms. These cells are able to produce all the tissues of the body. Later in development, during gastrulation, the three germ layers form, and most cells become more restricted in the types of cells that they can produce.

  • Differentiation and the Fate of Cells

    Differentiation and the Fate of Cells

    Animations

    (1 min 29 sec) As a human embryo develops, its cells become progressively restricted in the types of specialized cells that they can produce. Inner cell mass (ICM) cells of the blastocyst can make any type of body cell. Gastrula-stage cells can give rise to the cells of a given germ layer. Later, cells become even more restricted. For example, the pancreatic bud of the endoderm layer can only make the cells of the pancreas.

  • Creating Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

    Creating Embryonic Stem Cell Lines

    Animations

    (1 min 38 sec) The inner cell mass (ICM) cells of blastocyst-stage early human embryos can be removed and cultured. These cells can be grown in the lab indefinitely. Various growth factors cause these cells to develop into a variety of differentiated cells, such as muscle or nerve cells.

  • Newt Limb Regeneration

    Newt Limb Regeneration

    Animations

    (1 min 21 sec) Urodele amphibians—newts and salamanders—are able to regenerate fully functional limbs in response to amputation. Cells in and near the limb stump dedifferentiate to form a mass of stemlike cells that can produce all the specialized tissues of the limb, such as muscle, nerves, and blood vessels.

  • Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Animation

    Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Animation

    Animations

    (52 sec) Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technique for cloning. The nucleus is removed from a healthy egg. This egg becomes the host for a nucleus that is transplanted from another cell, such as a skin cell. The resulting embryo can be used to generate embryonic stem cells with a genetic match to the nucleus donor (therapeutic cloning), or can be implanted into a surrogate mother to create a cloned individual, such as Dolly the sheep (reproductive cloning).

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