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Showing 1-77 of 77 Resources
  • Ecology, Food Webs, and the Chesapeake Bay

    Ecology, Food Webs, and the Chesapeake Bay

    Lecture

    (49 min 3 sec) A discussion of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, its complex food web, and the challenges of conserving and restoring the bay.

  • Climate Stress and Coastal Food Webs

    Climate Stress and Coastal Food Webs

    Lecture

    (43 min 18 sec) We are in the midst of a major die-off of coastal wetlands – what is to blame?

  • Floods, Droughts, and Food Chains

    Floods, Droughts, and Food Chains

    Lecture

    (44 min 27 sec) How a river's community of herbivores and predators is affected by changes in river flow.

  • Untangling Salt Marsh Food Webs

    Untangling Salt Marsh Food Webs

    Lecture

    (45 min 16 sec) The revelation that salt marshes are controlled by top-down forces of herbivores and other consumers.

  • Trophic Cascades in Rivers

    Trophic Cascades in Rivers

    Lecture

    (44 min 27 sec) How fishes in a river ecosystem play a critical role in forming the aquascape.

  • Ecology of Rivers and Coasts—Food Webs and Human Impacts

    Ecology of Rivers and Coasts—Food Webs and Human Impacts

    Lecture

    Two leading ecologists describe the complex interactions between species and their environment in aquatic ecosystems. 

  • Student Discussion on Patterns and Processes in Ecology

    Student Discussion on Patterns and Processes in Ecology

    Lecture

    (56 min 17 sec) The 2015 Holiday Lecture discussion session.

  • The Science of Camera Traps

    The Science of Camera Traps

    Lecture

    (23 min 44 sec) A discussion of camera traps and their use in ecological research.

  • Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems

    Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems

    Lecture

    (25 min 21 sec) Two important questions in ecology are "How do we conserve ecosystems?" and  "When we try to restore damaged ecosystems, what state do we restore them to?"

  • Communities as Ecological Networks

    Communities as Ecological Networks

    Lecture

    (41 min 18 sec) Ecosystems include complex interactions between animals and plants, which can be measured experimentally and investigated using mathematical models.

  • Modeling Populations and Species Interactions

    Modeling Populations and Species Interactions

    Lecture

    (30 min 38 sec) Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique provides several examples for how to model the growth of animal populations and then check the models against actual data. 

  • How Species Coexist

    How Species Coexist

    Lecture

    (27 min 25 sec) Large herbivores in the African savanna coexist by partitioning ecological niches by time, space, and diet.

  • Patterns in Nature

    Patterns in Nature

    Lecture

    (35 min 51 sec) Regular spatial patterns abound in natural systems. Understanding how patterns arise in ecosystems provides insights into how these ecosystems function.

  • Africa's Savanna Ecosystems

    Africa's Savanna Ecosystems

    Lecture

    (24 min 56 sec) Savannas cover 20 percent of Earth’s surface and much of Africa. The patterns and processes that occur in this globally important biome illustrate core concepts in ecology.

  • Patterns and Processes in Ecology

    Patterns and Processes in Ecology

    Lecture

    What controls the numbers and distributions of animals in their environment? How do animals interact with other species? How do natural patterns arise in nature? Find out in the 2015 Holiday Lectures on Science.

  • Saving Biodiversity Discussion

    Saving Biodiversity Discussion

    Lecture

    (57 min 28 sec) A sixty-minute discussion on biodiversity.

  • Dodging Extinction

    Dodging Extinction

    Lecture

    (31 min 12 sec) What steps can be taken to avoid the sixth mass extinction?

  • Ocean Species Respond to Climate Change

    Ocean Species Respond to Climate Change

    Lecture

    (29 min 39 sec) Coral reefs, how they are threatened by climate change, and how to protect them.

  • Extreme Life of the Sea

    Extreme Life of the Sea

    Lecture

    (29 min 27 sec) The threat to biodiversity in the ocean differs from the threats on the land.

  • Rescuing Species

    Rescuing Species

    Lecture

    (29 min 1 sec) How to preserve genetic diversity that is threatened by habitat loss.

  • Humans, Biodiversity, and Habitat Loss

    Humans, Biodiversity, and Habitat Loss

    Lecture

    (33 min 4 sec) Human activities and their effects on biodiversity in the past, present, and future.

  • Learning from Past Extinctions

    Learning from Past Extinctions

    Lecture

    (29 min 6 sec) There is still time to avoid a sixth mass extinction.

  • Biodiversity in the Age of Humans

    Biodiversity in the Age of Humans

    Lecture

    Are we witnessing a sixth mass extinction? What factors threaten ecosystems on land and in the sea? What are researchers doing to try to conserve biodiversity and ecosystems?

  • Dog Genomics and Dogs as Model Organisms

    Dog Genomics and Dogs as Model Organisms

    Lecture

    (28 min 54 sec) Dr. Elinor Karlsson discusses her work with dogs as a model organism for genomic studies.

  • Genomic Medicine, Autism, and Cancer

    Genomic Medicine, Autism, and Cancer

    Lecture

    (37 min 26 sec) A student discussion with the lecturers of the 2013 Holiday Lectures on Science.

  • From Cancer Genomics to Cancer Drugs

    From Cancer Genomics to Cancer Drugs

    Lecture

    (58 min 46 sec) Genetic data from a large number of tumor types reveal commonly mutated genes and uncover connections between different types of cancer.

  • Decoding the Autism Puzzle

    Decoding the Autism Puzzle

    Lecture

    (58 min 5 sec) Over the past decade, the application of advanced DNA sequencing techniques has greatly increased our understanding of the genetic basis of autism.

  • Cancer As a Genetic Disease

    Cancer As a Genetic Disease

    Lecture

    (58 min 33 sec) Understanding that cancer is caused by mutations in genes that regulate cell proliferation has led to the development of targeted drug therapies.

  • Sizing Up the Brain Gene By Gene

    Sizing Up the Brain Gene By Gene

    Lecture

    (59 min 32 sec) Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have led to a better understanding of the many genes that play a role in brain development.

  • Medicine in the Genomic Era

    Medicine in the Genomic Era

    Lecture

    In the 2013 Holiday Lectures on Science, leading medical researchers explain how advances in genomics are revolutionizing their work, leading to a better understanding of disease and to improved treatments.

  • Discussion with Students on The Day The Mesozoic Died Short Film

    Discussion with Students on The Day The Mesozoic Died Short Film

    Lecture

    (42 min 27 sec) Students discuss the short film after a screening at the 2012 Holiday Lectures on Science.

  • Climate Discussion with Students

    Climate Discussion with Students

    Lecture

    (58 min 23 sec) A discussion on climate change with the students attending the 2012 Holiday Lectures on Science.

  • Climate Change: How Do We Know We're Not Wrong?

    Climate Change: How Do We Know We're Not Wrong?

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) Scientific evidence for global climate change is overwhelming, yet the American public remains skeptical. History provides insights into how a Cold War-era think tank became an influential source of anti-regulation sentiment.

  • Earth's Climate: Back to the Future

    Earth's Climate: Back to the Future

    Lecture

    (1 hr 27 min 59 sec) Earth has been both cooler and warmer in the past, but the change is usually gradual. The current rate of carbon dioxide increase is unprecedented in human history, and solutions to mitigate its effect on global warming are challenging to implement.

  • Building Scientific Knowledge: The Story of Plate Tectonics

    Building Scientific Knowledge: The Story of Plate Tectonics

    Lecture

    (57 min 59 sec) The theory of plate tectonics took many decades to become accepted. The process by which it was finally accepted provides a fascinating glimpse into how scientists build new scientific consensus.

  • The Deep History of a Living Planet

    The Deep History of a Living Planet

    Lecture

    (1 hr 28 min 29 sec) Microbes have been the dominant life form throughout Earth's history. Eukaryotes and animals evolved only after microbes evolved oxygen-generating photosynthesis.

  • Changing Planet: Past, Present, Future

    Changing Planet: Past, Present, Future

    Lecture

    Has Earth changed over deep time? How did Earth shape life and life shape Earth? What does Earth's climate in the distant past tell us about the future?

  • Reporting Scientific Results to the Public

    Reporting Scientific Results to the Public

    Lecture

    (1 hr 11 min 57 sec) Second discussion in the 2011 Holiday Lectures on human evolution, on how to effectively report scientific results to the general public.

  • Genetics of Bitter Taste Perception

    Genetics of Bitter Taste Perception

    Lecture

    (50 min 39 sec) How humans perceive bitter taste, and the evolution of taste perception.

  • Hominid Paleobiology

    Hominid Paleobiology

    Lecture

    (1 hr 33 min 25 sec) The hominid fossil record of the past six million years gives us surprising insights into the path of human evolution.

  • Stone Tools and the Evolution of Human Behavior

    Stone Tools and the Evolution of Human Behavior

    Lecture

    (58 min 31 sec) Stone tools are well-preserved evidence of past human activity.

  • Genetics of Human Origins and Adaptation

    Genetics of Human Origins and Adaptation

    Lecture

    (58 min 31 sec) Genetic evidence shows that humans evolved in Africa and continue to evolve.

  • Human Evolution and the Nature of Science

    Human Evolution and the Nature of Science

    Lecture

    (29 min 1 sec) How reasoning and evidence are used to understand human evolution.

  • Bones, Stones, and Genes: The Origin of Modern Humans

    Bones, Stones, and Genes: The Origin of Modern Humans

    Lecture

    Where and when did humans arise? What distinguishes us from other species? Did our distant ancestors look and behave like us?

  • Biology of the Mosquito Vector

    Biology of the Mosquito Vector

    Lecture

    (49 min 28 sec) This discussion from the 2010 Holiday Lectures on Science explores the ethics of genetically-modified organisms and other topics.

  • Solving SARS and Other Viral Mysteries

    Solving SARS and Other Viral Mysteries

    Lecture

    (58 min 33 sec) The SARS epidemic was successfully halted by a global research effort to identify a new virus.

  • Fighting Viruses in the Lab and Beyond

    Fighting Viruses in the Lab and Beyond

    Lecture

    (58 min 33 sec) Understanding the immune response is essential to developing safe vaccines for dengue and other diseases.

  • The Virus Hunter's Toolkit

    The Virus Hunter's Toolkit

    Lecture

    (58 min 33 sec) New technologies like the Virochip harness DNA's properties to identify and fight new viruses.

  • Dengue Fever: Breaking Epidemic Cycles

    Dengue Fever: Breaking Epidemic Cycles

    Lecture

    (58 min 33 sec) Learn about research aimed at thwarting dengue fever in the lab and in communities.

  • Viral Outbreak: The Science of Emerging Disease

    Viral Outbreak: The Science of Emerging Disease

    Lecture

    Watch two leading virus researchers explain how they use both simple and sophisticated technologies to detect and fight infectious agents.

  • Q&A on Cone Snails

    Q&A on Cone Snails

    Lecture

    (9 min 18 sec) In this ten-minute Q&A session, Dr. Olivera answers questions on cone snail behavior, venoms, and biodiversity.

  • Q&A on Quorum Sensing

    Q&A on Quorum Sensing

    Lecture

    (12 min 59 sec) In this 13-minute Q&A session, Dr. Bonnie Bassler answers questions on quorum sensing and other topics related to bacteria.

  • Biodiversity Discussion

    Biodiversity Discussion

    Lecture

    (1 hr 16 min 30 sec) A discussion on biodiversity, endangered habitats, and how best to preserve the Earth's ecosystems, presented by the lecturers along with Dr. E.O. Wilson and Dr. Eric Chivian.

  • Eavesdropping on Tiny Conspiracies

    Eavesdropping on Tiny Conspiracies

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) The quorum sensing system is a target for a new class of drugs that interfere with virulence without killing bacteria.

  • Biodiversity at a Snail's Pace

    Biodiversity at a Snail's Pace

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) Cone snails have evolved many different toxins for different uses. Total molecular biodiversity may number in the millions.

  • Shedding Light on an Invisible World

    Shedding Light on an Invisible World

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) Bacteria are capable of communicating and coordinating their activities with a molecular signaling system called quorum sensing.

  • From Venoms to Drugs

    From Venoms to Drugs

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) Venomous carniverous cone snails are a rich source of molecules for scientific research and potential drug development.

  • Exploring Biodiversity: The Search for New Medicines

    Exploring Biodiversity: The Search for New Medicines

    Lecture

    What medical secrets do venomous snails hold? How can listening in on bacterial conversations help develop new antibiotics? In four presentations, Dr. Bonnie L. Bassler and Dr. Baldomero M. Olivera reveal how a deeper understanding of nature and biodiversity informs their research into new medicines.

  • Neurobiology and Mental Illness

    Neurobiology and Mental Illness

    Lecture

    (1 hr 25 min 59 sec) The lecturers, joined by Dr. Kay Jamison of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Dr. Gerald Fischbach of the Simons Foundation, answer questions concerning autism, manic depression, and other mental illnesses.

  • Memories are Made of This

    Memories are Made of This

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) The cellular and molecular nature of learning and memory, investigated in simpler sea slugs and more-complex mice. Molecular basis of Alzheimer's disease.

  • Plan of Action: How the Spinal Cord Controls Movement

    Plan of Action: How the Spinal Cord Controls Movement

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) Understanding the neural circuits in the spinal cord that control movement.

  • Building Brains: The Molecular Logic of Neural Circuits

    Building Brains: The Molecular Logic of Neural Circuits

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) How a nerve cell gets its identity, sends axons, and makes connections with other cells.

  • Mapping Memory in the Brain

    Mapping Memory in the Brain

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) The history of localization of function in the brain, and research that led to the understanding of localization of memory.

  • Making Your Mind: Molecules, Motion, and Memory

    Making Your Mind: Molecules, Motion, and Memory

    Lecture

    What is mind? Can molecular biology help us understand mental function?

  • AIDS: Evolution of an Epidemic

    AIDS: Evolution of an Epidemic

    Lecture

    Why has it been so hard to develop a vaccine against HIV? How are new medicines revolutionizing AIDS treatment? Can AIDS be cured?

  • Potent Biology: Stem Cells, Cloning, and Regeneration

    Potent Biology: Stem Cells, Cloning, and Regeneration

    Lecture

    Doug Melton and Nadia Rosenthal are leaders in stem cell research, working primarily with mouse and human tissue. They will discuss where embryonic and adult stem cells come from and the biology of how they supply the cells the body needs.

  • Evolution: Constant Change and Common Threads

    Evolution: Constant Change and Common Threads

    Lecture

    How has the amazing diversity of plants and animals evolved? What can fossils, butterflies, and stickleback fish tell us about the deep common ancestry of all living forms?

  • The Science of Fat

    The Science of Fat

    Lecture

    In the 2004 Holiday Lectures on Science, HHMI investigators Ronald M. Evans and Jeffrey M. Friedman discuss how the body regulates weight by carefully controlling the storage and burning of fat—and how a better understanding of these complex metabolic systems could lead researchers to treatments that curb obesity and improve public health. Awards 2006 Telly Awards; Silver

  • Learning from Patients: The Science of Medicine

    Learning from Patients: The Science of Medicine

    Lecture

    As part of the 2003 Holiday Lectures on Science, Dr. Bert Vogelstein and Dr. Huda Y. Zoghbi discuss how their patients have led to a deeper understanding of the genetic and molecular bases of neurological disorders and cancer. Thanks to these patients, researchers can now apply the knowledge gained to diagnosis, prevention, and the search for cures.

  • Scanning Life's Matrix: Genes, Proteins, and Small Molecules

    Scanning Life's Matrix: Genes, Proteins, and Small Molecules

    Lecture

    In four presentations, Stuart L. Schreiber, PhD, and Eric S. Lander, PhD, open a window onto the fast-paced world of genomic science and chemical genetics.

  • The Meaning of Sex: Genes and Gender

    The Meaning of Sex: Genes and Gender

    Lecture

    Four talks focus on sex determination—the molecular and genetic mechanisms that determine whether an organism will be male, female or a hermaphrodite.

  • Clockwork Genes: Discoveries in Biological Time

    Clockwork Genes: Discoveries in Biological Time

    Lecture

    Four lectures highlight the research of two scientists who have made groundbreaking discoveries elucidating the molecular basis of circadian clocks—the internal timekeepers that govern fluctuations in behavior and physiology on a 24-hour cycle.

  • 2000 and Beyond: Confronting the Microbe Menace

    2000 and Beyond: Confronting the Microbe Menace

    Lecture

    (57 min 36 sec) In four presentations, Donald E. Ganem, MD, and B. Brett Finlay, PhD, discuss the latest advances in understanding how pathogens invade the body and how this knowledge is leading to the development of new therapies. They also explain how new infectious diseases are recognized and how epidemics arise.

  • Of Hearts and Hypertension: Blazing Genetic Trails

    Of Hearts and Hypertension: Blazing Genetic Trails

    Lecture

    In four lectures, Richard P. Lifton, MD, PhD, and Christine E. Seidman, MD, discuss their groundbreaking work in using genetic and molecular approaches to understand cardiovascular diseases.

  • Senses and Sensitivity: Neuronal Alliances for Sight and Sound

    Senses and Sensitivity: Neuronal Alliances for Sight and Sound

    Lecture

    In four talks, A. James Hudspeth, MD, PhD, and Jeremy H. Nathans, MD, PhD, discuss how sensory information is encoded and transmitted to the brain. They describe the detailed workings of two senses of great importance to humans—vision and hearing.

  • The Immune System: Friend and Foe

    The Immune System: Friend and Foe

    Lecture

    A wide overview of the immune system, presented by HHMI investigators John W. Kappler, PhD, and Philippa Marrack, PhD

  • The Double Life of RNA

    The Double Life of RNA

    Lecture

    In four lectures, Nobel laureate Thomas R. Cech, PhD, discusses the ability of RNA to act as more than just an intermediary between DNA and proteins.

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