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Showing 1-17 of 17 Resources
  • Comparing Human and Chimpanzee Tool Use

    Comparing Human and Chimpanzee Tool Use

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    (29 sec) Chimpanzees are capable of using rocks as tools to crack nuts for eating. But they don't appear to use sharp-edged tools.

  • Bee Colony Collapse Disorder

    Bee Colony Collapse Disorder

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    (7 min 46 sec) Charles Runckel, a graduate student in the DeRisi lab, uses the Virochip to examine the mystery of bee colony collapse disorder.

  • Cone Snails: Versatile Hunters

    Cone Snails: Versatile Hunters

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    (13 min 39 sec) Dr. Jason Biggs of the University of Guam Marine Laboratory discusses the anatomy of cone snails and introduces us to a variety of cone snail species with different tactics to hunt and capture their prey.

  • Conus tulipa hunts fish by net

    Conus tulipa hunts fish by net

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    (1 min 7 sec) Unlike a hook-and-line type fish-hunter, a net-hunting cone snail lures its prey into its wide mouth.

  • Conus textile strikes a snail

    Conus textile strikes a snail

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    (44 sec) A snail-hunting species of cone snail stings its prey repeatedly, inducing the prey to thrash about.

  • Conus striatus strikes a fish

    Conus striatus strikes a fish

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    (44 sec) A species of fish-hunting cone snail quickly immobilizes its prey and swallows it.

  • Conus imperialis strikes a worm

    Conus imperialis strikes a worm

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    (31 sec) A worm-hunting cone snail species feeds on fireworms, and is unaffected by the prey's sharp bristles.

  • Demonstration: Conus geographus can kill you

    Demonstration: Conus geographus can kill you

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    (1 min 35 sec) Larger cone snails produce more venom and are more dangerous to human beings in an accidental stinging.

  • Conus catus strikes a fish

    Conus catus strikes a fish

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    (1 min 11 sec) A fish-hunting cone snail strikes its prey with a venomous harpoon, causes paralysis, and eats it.

  • Conus bullatus "lightning strike"

    Conus bullatus "lightning strike"

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    (1 min 10 sec) This species of cone snail immobilizes its prey in a split second with lightning-strike cabal toxins.

  • Demonstration: Live Cone Snail

    Demonstration: Live Cone Snail

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    (1 min 3 sec) Dr. Olivera demonstrates a live specimen of Conus striatus.

  • Bobtail squid swimming and burrowing

    Bobtail squid swimming and burrowing

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    (1 min 3 sec) The bobtail squid swims during the night to hunt. During the day, it burrows to hide from predators.

  • Aplysia's gill-withdrawal reflex and sensitization

    Aplysia's gill-withdrawal reflex and sensitization

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    (1 min 25 sec) A touch to the Aplysia's siphon causes a gill withdrawal, a simple reflex for studying memory.

  • Demo: Meet a live Aplysia californica

    Demo: Meet a live Aplysia californica

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    (1 min 40 sec) Aplysia californica is a marine snail with a simple nervous system suitable for research on learning and memory.

  • Stickleback Environment

    Stickleback Environment

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    (1 min 27 sec) At the end of the ice age, the retreating ice sheet created many new lakes, some of which were colonized by sticklebacks.

  • Fruit Fly Courtship

    Fruit Fly Courtship

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    (55 sec) Male courtship dances in two fruit fly species show that the wing spots play a prominent role.

  • Dog Breeding

    Dog Breeding

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    (1 min 53 sec) The many forms of dogs that exist today were all created through selective breeding from the dog's ancestor, the wolf. In a span of less than 10,000 years, breeders have changed traits and body shapes of dogs by artificial selection-for example, emphasizing different aspects of hunting and herding behavior.