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Showing 1-9 of 9 Resources
  • Counting the Rings

    Counting the Rings

    Image of the Week

    An otolith from a lanternfish (Gymnoscopelus nicholsi) is used to estimate the fish’s age and growth rate.

  • See Your Inner Primate

    See Your Inner Primate

    Image of the Week

    The eye of a chimpanzee views the world in living color.

  • Q&A on Cone Snails

    Q&A on Cone Snails

    Lecture

    (9 min 18 sec) In this ten-minute Q&A session, Dr. Olivera answers questions on cone snail behavior, venoms, and biodiversity.

  • Biodiversity at a Snail's Pace

    Biodiversity at a Snail's Pace

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) Cone snails have evolved many different toxins for different uses. Total molecular biodiversity may number in the millions.

  • From Venoms to Drugs

    From Venoms to Drugs

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) Venomous carniverous cone snails are a rich source of molecules for scientific research and potential drug development.

  • Exploring Biodiversity: The Search for New Medicines

    Exploring Biodiversity: The Search for New Medicines

    Lecture

    What medical secrets do venomous snails hold? How can listening in on bacterial conversations help develop new antibiotics? In four presentations, Dr. Bonnie L. Bassler and Dr. Baldomero M. Olivera reveal how a deeper understanding of nature and biodiversity informs their research into new medicines.

  • Cone Snails: Versatile Hunters

    Cone Snails: Versatile Hunters

    Clip

    (13 min 39 sec) Dr. Jason Biggs of the University of Guam Marine Laboratory discusses the anatomy of cone snails and introduces us to a variety of cone snail species with different tactics to hunt and capture their prey.

  • Interview with Michael McIntosh

    Interview with Michael McIntosh

    Interview

    (4 min 38 sec) An interview with Dr. Michael McIntosh, who discovered the drug Prialt while working as an undergraduate in Dr. Olivera's lab.

  • Demonstration: Conus geographus can kill you

    Demonstration: Conus geographus can kill you

    Clip

    (1 min 35 sec) Larger cone snails produce more venom and are more dangerous to human beings in an accidental stinging.