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Series
Image of the Week

Summary

A weekly image selected from the striking imagery produced every day by scientists around the world.

Image of the Week is a feature of the HHMI BioInteractive website. A different image will be posted each week in order to highlight topics in the Life and Earth Sciences. Each of the images will be accompanied by a short description together with information about the author and web links for further study. The images will be archived on the HHMI BioInteractive website, and will be made freely available for download from a searchable database for educational purposes. For more info on Image of the Week or how to submit, consult the Related Materials to the right.

Image Gallery

In This Series (27)

by Wim van Egmond, Berkel en Rodenrijs, The Netherlands.

Dutch draper Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (1632–1723) built microscopes that allowed him to observe never-before-seen...

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by Gorongosa Restoration Project, Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique

Zebras on the move in a remote area of Gorongosa National Park in 2006.

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by Piotr Naskrecki PhD, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

Weaver ants labor to carry a live land snail back to their nest in Gorongosa National Park.

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by Piotr Naskrecki PhD, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

Gorongosa National Park is rich in diverse species including some found only in and near the park, like this pygmy chameleon...

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by In-Jung Kim, PhD, and Joshua Sanes, PhD, Center for Brain Science and Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

A unique group of cells in the eye’s retina specifically detects the upward motion of objects, such as a ball thrown in the...

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by Christopher C. Witt, PhD, University of New Mexico

The bill of the buff-tailed sicklebill hummingbird is perfectly shaped to collect nectar from deep within the Centropogon...

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by Fabian de Kok-Mercado, HHMI

A 3D model of the dengue virus reveals a shape like a soccer ball with an outer coating of glycoproteins.

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by Jürgen Otto, PhD

The male peacock spider performs a spectacular dance to attract a mate—but the female is not always impressed.

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by Sui Wang, PhD and Connie Cepko, PhD, Harvard Medical School

The arrangement of cells in the retina reveals how it detects, processes, and relays visual information to the brain.

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by Mark Ladinsky, PhD and Pamela Bjorkman PhD, California Instutute of Technology

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is discovered “hiding” between the cells of the gut.

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by Barbara Meyer, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Chromosomes change form as a cell divides to ensure that each daughter cell gets a full, intact copy of the genome.

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by David Haring, Duke University Lemur Center

Infant lemurs hitch a ride through the forest by holding on to their mother’s tummy or riding piggyback.

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by Jürgen Otto, PhD

Female peacock spiders stay with their young in an egg sac until they can fend for themselves. 

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by Nipam Patel, PhD and Danielle Liubicich, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

... but that's not all they'll do. Several genes determine the diverse shapes and functions of crustacean appendages. 

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by Lauren Brent, PhD, University of Exeter, UK and Duke University, USA

The shape of our hands comes from tree-dwelling ancestors.

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by Edward L. Stanley, PhD, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco CA

The Cape Cliff lizard sports a bony body armor.

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by Ted Daeschler, PhD, The Academy of Natural Sciences

Tiktaalik roseae, also known as the “fishapod,” is an animal that lived about 375 million years ago, with features of...

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by Adam Summers, PhD, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington

The fins of the scalyhead sculpin are related to our arms.

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by Suren Manvelyan, PhD

The eye of a chimpanzee views the world in living color.

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by Matt Gibson, PhD, Stowers Institute for Medical Research

The young starlet sea anemone forms tentacles by cell division, migration, and shape changes.   

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by Igor Siwanowicz, PhD, Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, VA

Many animals have a third eyelid called a nictitating membrane that protects the eye.

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by Omer Bayraktar, PhD, University of Oregon

The developing brain needs a constant source of new cells as it builds the circuits that will control behavior.

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by Nipam H. Patel, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

The golden birdwing provided a striking clue to the natural origin of species.

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by Nicole King, PhD, University of California, Berkeley

Sponges feed themselves through chambers of specialized cells.

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by Mark L. Riccio, PhD, Cornell University’s BRC CT Imaging Facility, and Flavio H. Fenton, PhD, Georgia Institute of Technology

An intricate three-dimensional network of blood vessels nourishes the heart.

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by Igor Siwanowicz, PhD, Janelia Farm Research Campus

A group of 14 stink bug eggs attached to the underside of a poplar leaf.

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by Daniel Berger, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

One approach to understanding the brain is to reconstruct the shapes and connections of individual neurons.

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