HomeOur ScientistsM. Celeste Simon

Our Scientists

M. Celeste Simon, PhD
Investigator / 2000–Present

Scientific Discipline

Cancer Biology, Developmental Biology

Host Institution

University of Pennsylvania

Current Position

Dr. Simon is also a professor of cell and developmental biology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and scientific director of the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute.

Current Research

Hypoxia, Angiogenesis, and Tumor Progression

Celeste Simon studies the molecular mechanisms regulating oxygen homeostasis, stem cell maintenance, angiogenesis, and hematopoiesis. As the majority of tumors include cells that are oxygen deprived, responses to oxygen availability promote cancer cell survival, cancer stem cell phenotypes, and tumor angiogenesis. As such, oxygen-sensitive molecules are appropriate targets for anticancer therapy.

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Vascular architecture of a mouse embryo...

Biography

Dr. Simon is also Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Scientific Director of the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute. She received her Ph.D. degree from…

Dr. Simon is also Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Scientific Director of the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute. She received her Ph.D. degree from the Rockefeller University and did postdoctoral research with Joseph Nevins at Rockefeller and with Stuart Orkin at Harvard Medical School. Before moving to Pennsylvania in 1999, Dr. Simon was an HHMI investigator at the University of Chicago.

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Education

  • BA, microbiology, Miami University
  • MS, microbiology, Ohio State University
  • PhD, molecular biology, The Rockefeller University

Awards

  • Stanley N. Cohen Award for Biomedical Research, University of Pennsylvania
  • Elliot Osserman Award, Israel Cancer Research Fund

Memberships

  • American Academy of Arts and Sciences