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Showing 1-40 of 115 Resources
  • Nature’s Cutest Symbiosis: The Bobtail Squid

    Nature’s Cutest Symbiosis: The Bobtail Squid

    Feature Film

    (8 min 5 sec) The bobtail squid is an underwater delicacy for many predators, so the creature found a handy superpower to stay alive: Invisibility

  • Termites Digest Wood Thanks To Microbes

    Termites Digest Wood Thanks To Microbes

    Feature Film

    (7 min 11 sec) The next time you spot a termite chomping down on wood, know that they’re not dining alone.

  • Fellow Travelers

    Fellow Travelers

    Image of the Week

    The human body is home to some thirty-nine trillion microbes that live in or on it.

  • Portrait of a Howler

    Portrait of a Howler

    Image of the Week

    Groups of black howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya) “howl” to each other in the Amazon rainforest during the evening and early morning hours in order to maintain neighborly distances.

  • Benefits of Schools

    Benefits of Schools

    Image of the Week

    Being in a school affords young barracuda several advantages over the solitary life.

  • Firefly Pyrotechnics

    Firefly Pyrotechnics

    Image of the Week

    Most firefly species employ characteristic patterns of bioluminescent flashes to elicit responses from potential mates.

  • How Lizards Find Their Way Home

    How Lizards Find Their Way Home

    Scientists at Work

    (8 min 33 sec) When Dr. Manuel Leal removed lizards from an area in the forest, he noticed an interesting phenomenon: all the lizards seemed to be back the next day. Watch as he sets up an experiment to study how these lizards navigate home. Also available in Spanish.

  • Dad Feathers

    Dad Feathers

    Image of the Week

    The male peafowl, or peacock, invests a lot in his appearance.

  • Root Movement

    Root Movement

    Image of the Week

    Root tips constantly search the soil for water and nutrients using the power of cell division and elongation.

  • Studying Elephant Communication

    Studying Elephant Communication

    Scientists at Work

    (6 min 43 sec) Elephants can communicate over long distances using low-frequency sounds that travel both in the air and through the ground. Scientists are studying whether elephants can “hear” and interpret these ground vibrations.

  • Bat Echolocation

    Bat Echolocation

    Data Point

    In this study, researchers tested whether bats change their behavior while hunting based on feedback from echolocation.

  • Sharklab

    Sharklab

    Image of the Week

    A team of scientists from The Bimini Biological Field Station collecting samples from a male tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier).

  • How Animals Use Sound to Communicate

    How Animals Use Sound to Communicate

    Click & Learn

    Using elephants, finches, bats, and moths, as case studies, explore different aspects of how animals use sound to communicate.

  • Following the Matriarch

    Following the Matriarch

    Image of the Week

    A herd of elephants moving across the floodplain grassland of Gorongosa National Park.

  • Undersea Fireworks

    Undersea Fireworks

    Image of the Week

    The tentacles of sea anemones contain thousands of stinging cells called nematocysts that are ready to fire for defense or attack. 

  • WildCam Lab

    WildCam Lab

    Click & Learn

    The WildCam Lab is a part of WildCam Gorongosa, an online citizen science platform where users identify animals in trail camera photos. Using the WildCam Lab, students can investigate ecological questions and test hypotheses by exploring trail camera data using an interactive map. 

  • Social Networking

    Social Networking

    Image of the Week

    The arrangement of nerve cells in the region of the brain called the hippocampus is essential for the formation and storage of new memories.

  • Mozambique Mounds

    Mozambique Mounds

    Image of the Week

    Termite mounds in central Mozambique appear as regularly spaced islands of dark-green vegetation in a sea of grassland. 

  • Wait for Me!

    Wait for Me!

    Image of the Week

    A remote trail camera captures a photo of an elephant calf trying to catch up to the rest of its family group in Gorongosa National Park.

  • WildCam Gorongosa

    WildCam Gorongosa

    Click & Learn

    Researchers in Gorongosa National Park use remote trail cameras to study the park’s wildlife. You can contribute to this important research through WildCam Gorongosa, an online citizen science platform.

  • Schooling Behavior of Stickleback Fish from Different Habitats

    Schooling Behavior of Stickleback Fish from Different Habitats

    Data Point

    A team of scientists studied the schooling behavior of threespine stickleback fish by experimentally testing how individual fish responded to an artificial fish school model.

  • School's Back!

    School's Back!

    Image of the Week

    Golden shiner fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas) stay in school for the shade.

  • Tick Hiker

    Tick Hiker

    Image of the Week

    An adult female Blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis), commonly known as the deer tick, awaits passing wildlife. 

  • Shades of Pollen

    Shades of Pollen

    Image of the Week

    The variety of colors of cells in a honeycomb comes from pollen collected from different plant species.

  • Dottyback in Damselfish Clothing

    Dottyback in Damselfish Clothing

    Image of the Week

    Dottyback fish change color by altering the proportions of yellow and black pigment cells in their skin to mimic Damselfish.

  • The Art of Hiding

    The Art of Hiding

    Image of the Week

    Animal mimics evolved markings that make them look either like other animals or inanimate objects.

  • Save Our Sawfish

    Save Our Sawfish

    Image of the Week

    A smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata) patrols the murky waters of the Everglades National Park in Florida.

  • Warthog Love

    Warthog Love

    Image of the Week

    Warthog mothers look after their young in small family groups.

  • Following Tracks In The Sky

    Following Tracks In The Sky

    Image of the Week

    The flight patterns of a flock of black vultures are revealed by a novel digital video technique.

  • The Lone Anole

    The Lone Anole

    Image of the Week

    The Plymouth anole (Anolis lividus) lizard is found only on the Caribbean island of Montserrat—and it is the only anole species living there.

  • Fruit Fly Art

    Fruit Fly Art

    Image of the Week

    Tracking the flight paths and speeds of fruit flies in a wind tunnel may help design better flying robots.

  • Holiday Lecture 2004 Update—Jeff Friedman

    Holiday Lecture 2004 Update—Jeff Friedman

    Clip

    (3 min 52 sec) HHMI investigator Jeff Friedman provides an update to his 2004 lectures on obesity.

  • Counting the Chirps of Fall

    Counting the Chirps of Fall

    Image of the Week

    A close-up view of the sound-producing structure on the wing of a field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus).

  • Putting Food on the Table

    Putting Food on the Table

    Image of the Week

    Weaver ants labor to carry a live land snail back to their nest in Gorongosa National Park.

  • Lizard Evolution Virtual Lab

    Lizard Evolution Virtual Lab

    Virtual Lab

    In the Lizard Evolution Virtual Lab students explore the evolution of the anole lizards in the Caribbean by collecting and analyzing their own data.  

  • Dinner Date

    Dinner Date

    Image of the Week

    The male peacock spider performs a spectacular dance to attract a mate—but the female is not always impressed.

  • Holding on to Your Mother

    Holding on to Your Mother

    Image of the Week

    Infant lemurs hitch a ride through the forest by holding on to their mother’s tummy or riding piggyback.

  • Good Moms Come in All Shapes and Sizes

    Good Moms Come in All Shapes and Sizes

    Image of the Week

    Female peacock spiders stay with their young in an egg sac until they can fend for themselves. 

  • Grasping Your Inner Monkey

    Grasping Your Inner Monkey

    Image of the Week

    The shape of our hands comes from tree-dwelling ancestors.

  • Beaks As Tools: Selective Advantage in Changing Environments

    Beaks As Tools: Selective Advantage in Changing Environments

    Activity

    This classroom experiment supports the film The Origin of Species: The Beak of the Finch. Students collect and analyze data to learn why even slight variations in beak size can make the difference between life and death.

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