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Showing 81-100 of 113 Resources
  • Your Armored Reptile

    Your Armored Reptile

    Image of the Week

    The Cape Cliff lizard sports a bony body armor.

  • Explore Your Inner Animals

    Explore Your Inner Animals

    Click & Learn

    This interactive explores different anatomical features of the human body and what they reveal about the evolutionary history we share with other organisms, including earlier, long-extinct species.

  • How the Sea Anemone Gets Its Tentacles

    How the Sea Anemone Gets Its Tentacles

    Image of the Week

    The young starlet sea anemone forms tentacles by cell division, migration, and shape changes.   

  • The Eye of a Red-eyed Tree Frog at Rest

    The Eye of a Red-eyed Tree Frog at Rest

    Image of the Week

    Many animals have a third eyelid called a nictitating membrane that protects the eye.

  • Wallace's Golden Birdwing Butterfly

    Wallace's Golden Birdwing Butterfly

    Image of the Week

    The golden birdwing provided a striking clue to the natural origin of species.

  • Let's Stick Together

    Let's Stick Together

    Image of the Week

    Sponges feed themselves through chambers of specialized cells.

  • Pearls or Stink Bug Eggs?

    Pearls or Stink Bug Eggs?

    Image of the Week

    A group of 14 stink bug eggs attached to the underside of a poplar leaf.

  • Film Guides: The Origin of Species: Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree

    Film Guides: The Origin of Species: Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree

    Film Guide

    The following classroom-ready resources complement The Origin of Species: Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree. Research on the anole lizards is enriching our understanding of evolutionary processes, such as adaptation by natural selection, convergent evolution, and the formation of new species. Also available in Spanish.

  • Film Guides: The Origin of Species: The Beak of the Finch

    Film Guides: The Origin of Species: The Beak of the Finch

    Film Guide

    The following classroom-ready resources complement The Origin of Species: The Beak of the Finch. By following four decades of research on the finches of the Galápagos islands, the film illustrates how geography and ecology can drive the evolution of new species.

  • Comparing Human and Chimpanzee Tool Use

    Comparing Human and Chimpanzee Tool Use

    Clip

    (29 sec) Chimpanzees are capable of using rocks as tools to crack nuts for eating. But they don't appear to use sharp-edged tools.

  • Bee Colony Collapse Disorder

    Bee Colony Collapse Disorder

    Clip

    (7 min 46 sec) Charles Runckel, a graduate student in the DeRisi lab, uses the Virochip to examine the mystery of bee colony collapse disorder.

  • Cone Snails: Versatile Hunters

    Cone Snails: Versatile Hunters

    Clip

    (13 min 39 sec) Dr. Jason Biggs of the University of Guam Marine Laboratory discusses the anatomy of cone snails and introduces us to a variety of cone snail species with different tactics to hunt and capture their prey.

  • Conus tulipa hunts fish by net

    Conus tulipa hunts fish by net

    Clip

    (1 min 7 sec) Unlike a hook-and-line type fish-hunter, a net-hunting cone snail lures its prey into its wide mouth.

  • Conus textile strikes a snail

    Conus textile strikes a snail

    Clip

    (44 sec) A snail-hunting species of cone snail stings its prey repeatedly, inducing the prey to thrash about.

  • Conus striatus strikes a fish

    Conus striatus strikes a fish

    Clip

    (44 sec) A species of fish-hunting cone snail quickly immobilizes its prey and swallows it.

  • Conus imperialis strikes a worm

    Conus imperialis strikes a worm

    Clip

    (31 sec) A worm-hunting cone snail species feeds on fireworms, and is unaffected by the prey's sharp bristles.

  • Demonstration: Conus geographus can kill you

    Demonstration: Conus geographus can kill you

    Clip

    (1 min 35 sec) Larger cone snails produce more venom and are more dangerous to human beings in an accidental stinging.

  • Conus catus strikes a fish

    Conus catus strikes a fish

    Clip

    (1 min 11 sec) A fish-hunting cone snail strikes its prey with a venomous harpoon, causes paralysis, and eats it.

  • Conus bullatus "lightning strike"

    Conus bullatus "lightning strike"

    Clip

    (1 min 10 sec) This species of cone snail immobilizes its prey in a split second with lightning-strike cabal toxins.

  • Demonstration: Live Cone Snail

    Demonstration: Live Cone Snail

    Clip

    (1 min 3 sec) Dr. Olivera demonstrates a live specimen of Conus striatus.

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