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Showing 61-80 of 113 Resources
  • Darwin the Entomologist

    Darwin the Entomologist

    Image of the Week

    As a student of divinity at Cambridge University, Charles Darwin was an enthusiastic collector of beetles

  • The Lone Anole

    The Lone Anole

    Image of the Week

    The Plymouth anole (Anolis lividus) lizard is found only on the Caribbean island of Montserrat—and it is the only anole species living there.

  • Host to Thousands

    Host to Thousands

    Image of the Week

    A freshwater snail infected with thousands of blood flukes will release the disease-causing parasites into the water where they can infect humans.

  • Vertebrate Circulatorium

    Vertebrate Circulatorium

    Click & Learn

    Compare and contrast the anatomy of the heart and the circulatory systems of major vertebrate groups and gain insights into their evolution.

  • Your Turkey’s Ancestors

    Your Turkey’s Ancestors

    Image of the Week

    A reconstruction of Anchiornis huxleyi, a feathered dinosaur that is part of the ancestral lineage of birds.

  • Have Your Larva and Eat It Too

    Have Your Larva and Eat It Too

    Image of the Week

    During the larval stage, the Nemertean worm develops inside a hollow sac from which the juvenile eventually emerges, rupturing the sac and then eating the remains.

  • Coral Bleaching

    Coral Bleaching

    Animation

    (3 min 48 sec) Zoom into a coral reef and discover photosynthetic algae inside the coral’s cells. Reef-building corals rely on these symbionts for their survival.

  • Double, Double, Toil and Trouble

    Double, Double, Toil and Trouble

    Image of the Week

    Two views of a late pupa of an unidentified midge species (family Chironomidae).

  • Secret of Coral-Reef Survival

    Secret of Coral-Reef Survival

    Image of the Week

    Reef-building corals depend on brown-colored symbiotic algae for survival.

  • Animated Life: Seeing the Invisible

    Animated Life: Seeing the Invisible

    Animated Short

    (6 min 31 sec) This animated feature celebrates 17th-century citizen-scientist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, whose discoveries of microbes changed our view of the biological world. Also available in Spanish.

  • Counting the Chirps of Fall

    Counting the Chirps of Fall

    Image of the Week

    A close-up view of the sound-producing structure on the wing of a field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus).

  • Biodiversity Rediscovered

    Biodiversity Rediscovered

    Image of the Week

    Gorongosa’s spiky pillbug had not been seen for 50 years.

  • Animalcules with Wheels

    Animalcules with Wheels

    Image of the Week

    Dutch draper Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (1632–1723) built microscopes that allowed him to observe never-before-seen microorganisms, including this rotifer. He called them “animalcules.”  

  • On Their Way Back

    On Their Way Back

    Image of the Week

    Zebras on the move in a remote area of Gorongosa National Park in 2006.

  • Putting Food on the Table

    Putting Food on the Table

    Image of the Week

    Weaver ants labor to carry a live land snail back to their nest in Gorongosa National Park.

  • Biodiversity at Your Fingertips

    Biodiversity at Your Fingertips

    Image of the Week

    Gorongosa National Park is rich in diverse species including some found only in and near the park, like this pygmy chameleon.

  • Dinner Date

    Dinner Date

    Image of the Week

    The male peacock spider performs a spectacular dance to attract a mate—but the female is not always impressed.

  • Holding on to Your Mother

    Holding on to Your Mother

    Image of the Week

    Infant lemurs hitch a ride through the forest by holding on to their mother’s tummy or riding piggyback.

  • Good Moms Come in All Shapes and Sizes

    Good Moms Come in All Shapes and Sizes

    Image of the Week

    Female peacock spiders stay with their young in an egg sac until they can fend for themselves. 

  • These Limbs Are Made for Walkin'...

    These Limbs Are Made for Walkin'...

    Image of the Week

    ... but that's not all they'll do. Several genes determine the diverse shapes and functions of crustacean appendages. 

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