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Showing 1-42 of 42 Resources
  • EarthViewer

    EarthViewer

    Click & Learn

    Download the accompanying student worksheet under "Downloads." What did Earth look like 250 million years ago? Or 1 billion years ago? Or 4.5 billion years ago? EarthViewer is an interactive tool that allows you to explore the science of Earth's deep history.

  • Asteroid Impact?

    Asteroid Impact?

    Image of the Week

    A living foraminifer, Orbulina universa, in the act of shortening its spines in preparation for gametogenesis.

  • Sound and Vision

    Sound and Vision

    Image of the Week

    A mass of cells surrounded by blood vessels visualized in a living mouse using photoacoustic imaging.

  • Eat Your Vitamins

    Eat Your Vitamins

    Image of the Week

    Ascorbic acid, or Vitamin C, is an essential component of the human diet.

  • Written in Chalk

    Written in Chalk

    Image of the Week

    The world’s chalk deposits are made of fossilized remains of the shells of tiny microscopic algae.

  • Ocean Acidification

    Ocean Acidification

    Activity

    In this hands-on activity, students simulate the effects of decreasing pH caused by rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  • The Shy Shark's Secret

    The Shy Shark's Secret

    Image of the Week

    The Chain catshark (Scyliorhinus retifer) fluoresces bright green when illuminated in blue light.

  • Seeing Single Molecules

    Seeing Single Molecules

    Image of the Week

    Pushing the limits of light microscopy to the nanoscale, new technology allows visualization of single proteins in cells.

  • Earth Systems Activity

    Earth Systems Activity

    Activity

    This activity guides students through building a conceptual model of how carbon dioxide affects Earth's climate

  • Geological History of Oxygen

    Geological History of Oxygen

    Click & Learn

    Explore the changes in oxygen levels throughout Earth’s history and discover their impact on life.

  • The Day the Mesozoic Died

    The Day the Mesozoic Died

    Short Film

    (33 min 43 sec) The disappearance of the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period posed one of the greatest, long-standing scientific mysteries. This three-act film tells the story of the extraordinary detective work that solved it. Also available in Spanish.

  • Earth's Climate: Back to the Future

    Earth's Climate: Back to the Future

    Lecture

    (1 hr 27 min 59 sec) Earth has been both cooler and warmer in the past, but the change is usually gradual. The current rate of carbon dioxide increase is unprecedented in human history, and solutions to mitigate its effect on global warming are challenging to implement.

  • Calculating Iridium Fallout From an Asteroid Impact

    Calculating Iridium Fallout From an Asteroid Impact

    Activity

    A worksheet in which students calculate how much iridium was released, and eventually deposited all over the Earth, by the impact of the asteroid that caused the K-T extinction.

  • Distribution of Elements in Earth’s Crust

    Distribution of Elements in Earth’s Crust

    Activity

    A lesson in which students read a passage and answer questions about the information presented, testing their non-fiction reading comprehension.

  • Chemical Signatures of Asteroid Impacts

    Chemical Signatures of Asteroid Impacts

    Activity

    A lesson in which students analyze the chemical data that led researchers to conclude that the K-T boundary layer contained an extraordinary concentration of iridium. 

  • Winogradsky columns: Microbial ecology in the classroom

    Winogradsky columns: Microbial ecology in the classroom

    Activity

    An activity that recreates zones of microbial activity in a glass column. To accompany the lecture series Changing Planet: Past, Present, Future.

  • Ice Crystal Formation in Icefish and Non-Icefish Blood

    Ice Crystal Formation in Icefish and Non-Icefish Blood

    Activity

    A dramatic demonstration that simulates how tiny ice crystals would form and grow in the blood of most fish if they ventured into the icy waters of the Antarctic.

  • Screening chemical libraries with robotics

    Screening chemical libraries with robotics

    Clip

    (1 min 24 sec) Robotic equipment makes it possible to screen massive chemical libraries in just a matter of days.

  • Molecular Structure of Fat

    Molecular Structure of Fat

    Click & Learn

    This slide show delves into the various molecular shapes that fat can take.

  • Paired DNA strands

    Paired DNA strands

    Animation

    (1 min 18 sec) DNA has a double helix structure. If untwisted, DNA looks like two parallel strands. Each strand has a linear sequence of A, C, G, and T. The precise order of the letters carries the coded instructions. One strand is a complementary image of the other: A always pairs with T, and C always pairs with G.

  • Classroom Activities: Molecular Menagerie

    Classroom Activities: Molecular Menagerie

    Activity

    To accompany the lecture series Scanning Life's Matrix: Genes, Proteins, and Small Molecules.

  • Small-Molecule Diversity

    Small-Molecule Diversity

    Click & Learn

    Small molecules are chemicals that can interact with proteins to affect their functions. Learn about the structure and biological functions of various small molecules like sugar and caffeine.

  • Microarray Manufacturing Technology

    Microarray Manufacturing Technology

    Click & Learn

    How both gene chips and microarray slides are created.

  • Chemical Genomics: New Tools for Medicine

    Chemical Genomics: New Tools for Medicine

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) Scientists now have the ability to create millions of new molecules. How do they test whether any of these molecules are useful?

  • Probing Genes and Genomes

    Probing Genes and Genomes

    Lecture

    (58 min) To understand life's processes, perturb them. How a process responds to an insult can provide clues about normal function or mimic a specific disease state.

  • Scanning Life's Matrix: Genes, Proteins, and Small Molecules

    Scanning Life's Matrix: Genes, Proteins, and Small Molecules

    Lecture

    In four presentations, Stuart L. Schreiber, PhD, and Eric S. Lander, PhD, open a window onto the fast-paced world of genomic science and chemical genetics.

  • Diversity-Oriented Synthesis

    Diversity-Oriented Synthesis

    Clip

    (5 min 42 sec) Diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) is a strategy used by chemical biologists to create a huge diversity of small molecules with potentially useful properties. A scientist working in Dr. Stuart Schreiber's lab shows us how engineering, computer science, chemisty, and biology are all used in DOS.

  • Furrowstatin

    Furrowstatin

    Clip

    (4 min 41 sec) The small molecule 'furrowstatin' exemplifies the power of using small molecules to investigate life's processes. When applied to dividing cells, the furrowstatin halts cell division.

  • DOS Matrix

    DOS Matrix

    Animation

    (1 min 20 sec) In diversity-oriented synthesis, many combinations of chemical building blocks undergo relatively few reaction steps to form a vast variety of different molecules. In this example, 45 x 45 x 45 combinations yield more than 88,000 novel molecules.

  • Chemspace

    Chemspace

    Animation

    (1 min 35 sec) The hypothetical relationship of chemical space and biological space is plotted on a three-dimensional graph, giving a glimpse of the future direction of research at the intersections of various disciplines.

  • Rapamycin

    Rapamycin

    Animation

    (1 min 10 sec) Rapamycin is a small molecule originally isolated from nature. It has antibiotic and immunosuppressive properties. It also allows two proteins which do not normally interact to bind together in the cell, which causes problems in the nutrient-sensing pathway.

  • Small-Molecule Microarrays

    Small-Molecule Microarrays

    Animation

    (1 min) Microarray technology is useful for screening many small molecules at once. Automated devices have made it possible for thousands of different small molecules to be printed as an array of spots on a glass slide. A single type of protein which has been tagged with a fluorescent marker can then be washed across the array. Any small molecule that binds to the protein can be detected by scanning for spots that are fluorescent.

  • Diversity of Small Molecules

    Diversity of Small Molecules

    Animation

    (1 min 57 sec) A molecular menagerie of small molecules is displayed, with two particular molecules singled out for attention: rapamycin and furrowstatin, which are discussed in the remainder of Dr. Schreiber's lectures on chemical genetics.

  • Using Small Molecules to Modulate a Protein

    Using Small Molecules to Modulate a Protein

    Animation

    This animation illustrates how a small molecule binds to a protein. As a result of the binding, the protein alters its shape and becomes inactivated.

  • Life at the End of the Chromosome: Another RNA Machine

    Life at the End of the Chromosome: Another RNA Machine

    Lecture

    (58 min 20 sec) The chromosome ends, or telomeres, are necessary for DNA stability and replication.

  • How to Accelerate a Reaction 100,000,000,000 Times Using Only RNA

    How to Accelerate a Reaction 100,000,000,000 Times Using Only RNA

    Lecture

    (58 min 29 sec) Studies of RNA catalytic centers have revealed much about their structure and mode of action.

  • RNA as an Enzyme: Discovery, Origins of Life, and Medical Possibilities

    RNA as an Enzyme: Discovery, Origins of Life, and Medical Possibilities

    Lecture

    (58 min 22 sec) Discovery of RNA's catalytic activity led to unexpected spin-offs, including a new scenario for the origin of life.

  • Catalysis: Chemical and Biochemical

    Catalysis: Chemical and Biochemical

    Lecture

    (58 min 25 sec) Cellular enzymes are catalysts that tame reactions by accelerating them, lending specificity, and regulating their time and place.

  • The Double Life of RNA

    The Double Life of RNA

    Lecture

    In four lectures, Nobel laureate Thomas R. Cech, PhD, discusses the ability of RNA to act as more than just an intermediary between DNA and proteins.

  • Mr. Lincoln Glows

    Mr. Lincoln Glows

    Clip

    (4 min 5 sec) Dr. Cech uses a penny and a beaker of acetone to illustrate how a catalyst works.

  • Oxalate Catalysis

    Oxalate Catalysis

    Clip

    (6 min 9 sec) Without an appropriate catalyst some chemical reactions would be so slow as to appear not to occur at all on the human timescale. However, when catalyzed, these reactions can be very dramatic.

  • Which Balloon Has Hydrogen?

    Which Balloon Has Hydrogen?

    Clip

    (5 min 7 sec) Air is an invisible gas as are hydrogen and helium. How can you tell if a balloon contains hydrogen? Hydrogen has particular physical and chemical properties that can be tested. Dr. Cech enlists student volunteers to show how a chemical reaction can be used to identify a substance.

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