Search Results

Search Results

Showing 1-20 of 29 Resources
  • How Lizards Find Their Way Home

    How Lizards Find Their Way Home

    Scientists at Work

    (8 min 33 sec) When Dr. Manuel Leal removed lizards from an area in the forest, he noticed an interesting phenomenon: all the lizards seemed to be back the next day. Watch as he sets up an experiment to study how these lizards navigate home. Also available in Spanish.

  • Studying Elephant Communication

    Studying Elephant Communication

    Scientists at Work

    (6 min 43 sec) Elephants can communicate over long distances using low-frequency sounds that travel both in the air and through the ground. Scientists are studying whether elephants can “hear” and interpret these ground vibrations.

  • Selection for Tuskless Elephants

    Selection for Tuskless Elephants

    Scientists at Work

    (6 min 39 sec) Working in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique, Dr. Joyce Poole and colleagues made a striking observation: many female elephants lack tusks.

  • Steve Palumbi & Megan Morikawa Study Coral Reef Damage in American Samoa

    Steve Palumbi & Megan Morikawa Study Coral Reef Damage in American Samoa

    Scientists at Work

    (7 min 1 sec) Field research on coral bleaching suggests possibilities for saving threatened reefs.

  • Ocean Species Respond to Climate Change

    Ocean Species Respond to Climate Change

    Lecture

    (29 min 39 sec) Coral reefs, how they are threatened by climate change, and how to protect them.

  • Extreme Life of the Sea

    Extreme Life of the Sea

    Lecture

    (29 min 27 sec) The threat to biodiversity in the ocean differs from the threats on the land.

  • Comparing Human and Chimpanzee Tool Use

    Comparing Human and Chimpanzee Tool Use

    Clip

    (29 sec) Chimpanzees are capable of using rocks as tools to crack nuts for eating. But they don't appear to use sharp-edged tools.

  • Bee Colony Collapse Disorder

    Bee Colony Collapse Disorder

    Clip

    (7 min 46 sec) Charles Runckel, a graduate student in the DeRisi lab, uses the Virochip to examine the mystery of bee colony collapse disorder.

  • Cone Snails: Versatile Hunters

    Cone Snails: Versatile Hunters

    Clip

    (13 min 39 sec) Dr. Jason Biggs of the University of Guam Marine Laboratory discusses the anatomy of cone snails and introduces us to a variety of cone snail species with different tactics to hunt and capture their prey.

  • Conus tulipa hunts fish by net

    Conus tulipa hunts fish by net

    Clip

    (1 min 7 sec) Unlike a hook-and-line type fish-hunter, a net-hunting cone snail lures its prey into its wide mouth.

  • Conus textile strikes a snail

    Conus textile strikes a snail

    Clip

    (44 sec) A snail-hunting species of cone snail stings its prey repeatedly, inducing the prey to thrash about.

  • Conus striatus strikes a fish

    Conus striatus strikes a fish

    Clip

    (44 sec) A species of fish-hunting cone snail quickly immobilizes its prey and swallows it.

  • Conus imperialis strikes a worm

    Conus imperialis strikes a worm

    Clip

    (31 sec) A worm-hunting cone snail species feeds on fireworms, and is unaffected by the prey's sharp bristles.

  • Demonstration: Conus geographus can kill you

    Demonstration: Conus geographus can kill you

    Clip

    (1 min 35 sec) Larger cone snails produce more venom and are more dangerous to human beings in an accidental stinging.

  • Conus catus strikes a fish

    Conus catus strikes a fish

    Clip

    (1 min 11 sec) A fish-hunting cone snail strikes its prey with a venomous harpoon, causes paralysis, and eats it.

  • Conus bullatus "lightning strike"

    Conus bullatus "lightning strike"

    Clip

    (1 min 10 sec) This species of cone snail immobilizes its prey in a split second with lightning-strike cabal toxins.

  • Demonstration: Live Cone Snail

    Demonstration: Live Cone Snail

    Clip

    (1 min 3 sec) Dr. Olivera demonstrates a live specimen of Conus striatus.

  • Bobtail squid swimming and burrowing

    Bobtail squid swimming and burrowing

    Clip

    (1 min 3 sec) The bobtail squid swims during the night to hunt. During the day, it burrows to hide from predators.

  • Aplysia's gill-withdrawal reflex and sensitization

    Aplysia's gill-withdrawal reflex and sensitization

    Clip

    (1 min 25 sec) A touch to the Aplysia's siphon causes a gill withdrawal, a simple reflex for studying memory.

  • Demo: Meet a live Aplysia californica

    Demo: Meet a live Aplysia californica

    Clip

    (1 min 40 sec) Aplysia californica is a marine snail with a simple nervous system suitable for research on learning and memory.

Refine Results

Narrow your choices by selecting areas below.

Topics