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Showing 1-20 of 22 Resources
  • How Animals Use Sound to Communicate

    How Animals Use Sound to Communicate

    Click & Learn

    Using elephants, finches, bats, and moths, as case studies, explore different aspects of how animals use sound to communicate.

  • Selection for Tuskless Elephants

    Selection for Tuskless Elephants

    Scientists at Work

    (6 min 39 sec) Working in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique, Dr. Joyce Poole and colleagues made a striking observation: many female elephants lack tusks.

  • Mozambique Mounds

    Mozambique Mounds

    Image of the Week

    Termite mounds in central Mozambique appear as regularly spaced islands of dark-green vegetation in a sea of grassland. 

  • Cracking the Hardest Nut

    Cracking the Hardest Nut

    Image of the Week

    The Large Ground-Finch (Geospiza magnirostris) has the largest beak of all Darwin’s finches on the Galápagos Islands.

  • Beak of the Finch Film With Quiz

    Beak of the Finch Film With Quiz

    Interactive Video

    (15 min 54 sec) Embedded quiz modules test students’ understanding as they watch a short film on the evolution of the finch species found on the Galápagos Islands.

  • The Art of Hiding

    The Art of Hiding

    Image of the Week

    Animal mimics evolved markings that make them look either like other animals or inanimate objects.

  • In A Different Light

    In A Different Light

    Image of the Week

    A tree scorpion illuminated with UV light gives off a blue-green glow.

  • Darwin the Entomologist

    Darwin the Entomologist

    Image of the Week

    As a student of divinity at Cambridge University, Charles Darwin was an enthusiastic collector of beetles

  • The Lone Anole

    The Lone Anole

    Image of the Week

    The Plymouth anole (Anolis lividus) lizard is found only on the Caribbean island of Montserrat—and it is the only anole species living there.

  • Vertebrate Circulatorium

    Vertebrate Circulatorium

    Click & Learn

    Compare and contrast the anatomy of the heart and the circulatory systems of major vertebrate groups and gain insights into their evolution.

  • Your Turkey’s Ancestors

    Your Turkey’s Ancestors

    Image of the Week

    A reconstruction of Anchiornis huxleyi, a feathered dinosaur that is part of the ancestral lineage of birds.

  • Coral Bleaching

    Coral Bleaching

    Animation

    (3 min 48 sec) Zoom into a coral reef and discover photosynthetic algae inside the coral’s cells. Reef-building corals rely on these symbionts for their survival.

  • Holding on to Your Mother

    Holding on to Your Mother

    Image of the Week

    Infant lemurs hitch a ride through the forest by holding on to their mother’s tummy or riding piggyback.

  • Explore Your Inner Animals

    Explore Your Inner Animals

    Click & Learn

    This interactive explores different anatomical features of the human body and what they reveal about the evolutionary history we share with other organisms, including earlier, long-extinct species.

  • Wallace's Golden Birdwing Butterfly

    Wallace's Golden Birdwing Butterfly

    Image of the Week

    The golden birdwing provided a striking clue to the natural origin of species.

  • Film Guides: The Origin of Species: Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree

    Film Guides: The Origin of Species: Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree

    Film Guide

    The following classroom-ready resources complement The Origin of Species: Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree. Research on the anole lizards is enriching our understanding of evolutionary processes, such as adaptation by natural selection, convergent evolution, and the formation of new species. Also available in Spanish.

  • Film Guides: The Origin of Species: The Beak of the Finch

    Film Guides: The Origin of Species: The Beak of the Finch

    Film Guide

    The following classroom-ready resources complement The Origin of Species: The Beak of the Finch. By following four decades of research on the finches of the Galápagos islands, the film illustrates how geography and ecology can drive the evolution of new species.

  • Comparing Human and Chimpanzee Tool Use

    Comparing Human and Chimpanzee Tool Use

    Clip

    (29 sec) Chimpanzees are capable of using rocks as tools to crack nuts for eating. But they don't appear to use sharp-edged tools.

  • From Butterflies to Humans

    From Butterflies to Humans

    Lecture

    (58 min 30 sec) How and why butterflies and fruit flies got their spots, and the fossil record for human evolution.

  • Stickleback Environment

    Stickleback Environment

    Clip

    (1 min 27 sec) At the end of the ice age, the retreating ice sheet created many new lakes, some of which were colonized by sticklebacks.

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