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Showing 1-20 of 40 Resources
  • Firefly Pyrotechnics

    Firefly Pyrotechnics

    Image of the Week

    Most firefly species employ characteristic patterns of bioluminescent flashes to elicit responses from potential mates.

  • Larval Biscuit

    Larval Biscuit

    Image of the Week

    A pluteus larva of the sea biscuit, Clypeaster subdepressus, an echinoderm closely related to sea urchins.

  • Sharklab

    Sharklab

    Image of the Week

    A team of scientists from The Bimini Biological Field Station collecting samples from a male tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier).

  • WildCam Lab

    WildCam Lab

    Click & Learn

    The WildCam Lab is a part of WildCam Gorongosa, an online citizen science platform where users identify animals in trail camera photos. Using the WildCam Lab, students can investigate ecological questions and test hypotheses by exploring trail camera data using an interactive map. 

  • Slug Power

    Slug Power

    Image of the Week

    The sea slug, Elysia crispata belongs to a group called the sacoglossans—mostly herbivores that feed, mate and lay eggs on algae.  

  • Crystals and the Color of Skin

    Crystals and the Color of Skin

    Image of the Week

    The panther chameleon alters the arrangement of tiny crystals in its skin to change color.

  • New Year Bash

    New Year Bash

    Image of the Week

    Some mantis shrimps, for example, Odontodactylus sp., can smash open prey, such as snails and crabs, using powerful specialized limbs.

  • Wait for Me!

    Wait for Me!

    Image of the Week

    A remote trail camera captures a photo of an elephant calf trying to catch up to the rest of its family group in Gorongosa National Park.

  • WildCam Gorongosa

    WildCam Gorongosa

    Click & Learn

    Researchers in Gorongosa National Park use remote trail cameras to study the park’s wildlife. You can contribute to this important research through WildCam Gorongosa, an online citizen science platform.

  • Shades of Pollen

    Shades of Pollen

    Image of the Week

    The variety of colors of cells in a honeycomb comes from pollen collected from different plant species.

  • Save Our Sawfish

    Save Our Sawfish

    Image of the Week

    A smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata) patrols the murky waters of the Everglades National Park in Florida.

  • Warthog Love

    Warthog Love

    Image of the Week

    Warthog mothers look after their young in small family groups.

  • Following Tracks In The Sky

    Following Tracks In The Sky

    Image of the Week

    The flight patterns of a flock of black vultures are revealed by a novel digital video technique.

  • The Lone Anole

    The Lone Anole

    Image of the Week

    The Plymouth anole (Anolis lividus) lizard is found only on the Caribbean island of Montserrat—and it is the only anole species living there.

  • Have Your Larva and Eat It Too

    Have Your Larva and Eat It Too

    Image of the Week

    During the larval stage, the Nemertean worm develops inside a hollow sac from which the juvenile eventually emerges, rupturing the sac and then eating the remains.

  • Putting Food on the Table

    Putting Food on the Table

    Image of the Week

    Weaver ants labor to carry a live land snail back to their nest in Gorongosa National Park.

  • Lizard Evolution Virtual Lab

    Lizard Evolution Virtual Lab

    Virtual Lab

    In the Lizard Evolution Virtual Lab students explore the evolution of the anole lizards in the Caribbean by collecting and analyzing their own data.  

  • A Flower That Fits the Bill

    A Flower That Fits the Bill

    Image of the Week

    The bill of the buff-tailed sicklebill hummingbird is perfectly shaped to collect nectar from deep within the Centropogon flower.

  • Holding on to Your Mother

    Holding on to Your Mother

    Image of the Week

    Infant lemurs hitch a ride through the forest by holding on to their mother’s tummy or riding piggyback.

  • Beaks As Tools: Selective Advantage in Changing Environments

    Beaks As Tools: Selective Advantage in Changing Environments

    Activity

    This classroom experiment supports the film The Origin of Species: The Beak of the Finch. Students collect and analyze data to learn why even slight variations in beak size can make the difference between life and death.

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